Fadzly's blog on his photography

Posts tagged “Boat

Bokeh Schmokeh Fish Cart (36810028)

Leica R6 | Summicron-R 35/2.0
Teluk Ketapang Beach, Kuala Terengganu (2006)

IMO, the fewer the lens elements, the more you have to stop down to get adequate sharpness in the plane of focus. This results in less blitzed out backgrounds in actual use. This applies to 3 element lenses vs. Tessars vs. Planars.

These are the findings of Mr Rick Denney which I find very useful and which you can also read at length on his site

1. Bokeh has several components, including edge effects around out-of-focus highlights and false edges in the rendering of out-of-focus details.
2. Bokeh rendering is not the same in all situations, and some lenses will be better than others in some situations and worse in other situations. The Vega in this test has produced some really ugly bokeh, not consistent with these results. Lens bokeh is not a single value, and each lens requires considerable experience to understand where it is good and where it is not.
3. Wider apertures do not necessarily improve bokeh.
4. Specular highlights and other out-of-focus bright spots don’t tell the whole bokeh story.
5. Longer focal lengths improve bokeh. If smooth rendering is important, get a longer lens and back up.
6. Double-gauss designs aren’t necessarily bad, but the bad ones are really bad.
7. Sonnar designs don’t necessarily have better bokeh, but they have the potential.
8. Reputation for good bokeh (e.g., the Jupiter) don’t always show in actual results.
9. Lens complexity seems to have little bearing on bokeh. Lens design, however, is paramount.
10. Apertures shapes are not really an issue with bokeh, especially near wide open. In none of these tests was aperture shape the main determinant in apparent bokeh quality. So, we should stop counting aperture blades. The lens with the most aperture blades was the B&L Tessar, but it had uniformly the worst bokeh.
11. Bokeh is subjective, but it is not an illusion.
12. Canon knows how to design a zoom lens. Nikon didn’t do too badly, either.
13. The Biometar is NOT better than the Vega, at least in these tests.
14. The inexpensive Zeiss Jena Sonnars provide a lot of bokeh quality for the buck.

Copyright © 1999, 2009 R. W. Denney, Jr.

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Coming Home (36810027)

Do you ever think what orientation suits best for the subject you are trying to capture or do you just press the shutter release button and try your luck?

Orientation can greatly affect how and what image is presenting.

Most novices shoot everything horizontally – well it is much easier to hold and shoot in horizontal mode – especially the compact cameras, no?

Gears: Leica R6 and Leica Summicron 35mm F/2.0, on Kodak Colorplus 200 Negative
Location: Tok Jembal Beach, Kuala Terengganu, Malaysia


My favourite spot under the bridge has never let me down (36850021)

Gears: Nikon FM2 with Nikon AFS Nikkor 50mm f/1.8 on Kodakcolor GOLD 400
Location: Under the bridge in Kuala Hiliran, Kuala Terengganu, Malaysia


Gears: Nikon FM2 with Nikon AFS Nikkor 50mm f/1.8 on Kodakcolor GOLD 400
Location: Under the bridge, Losong


You’re talking to me? (36910039)

You're talking to me? (36910039)

Yeah it’s that De Niro’s tone of voice again. Who wouldn’t be amazed by such a character. Well such characters are quite a common scene when you’re at the fishing dock. It was a very fine morning by the jetty and these men has just finished uploading their catch for the week.

Gears: Leica R6 with Summicron-R 35mm F/2.0 on Fuji Superia 100
Location: Chendering Fisheries Complex, Kuala Terengganu, Terengganu, Malaysia


A tribute to seafarers

Gears: Nikon D50 and Nikon 50mm F/1.8 AF-D Location: My brother's house, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

Seafarers can refer to ethnic groups living by the sea in Southeast Asia, and also other sea living ethnic groups in the world. The ethnic group name refers to a large distribution area along from the islands of Indonesia to Burma, which sometimes being group as Sea Gypsies.

In the South China Sea area, the ethnic group name is called as Orang Laut, which literally means the sea people in Malay. These malay peoples of Southeast Asia traced back the forefathers coming as far as Yunnan (now a province of China) some 5000-10000 years ago, they were seafarers that migrated along rivers such as Mekong and Irrawady to the Andaman Sea, South China Sea and various locations in the Malay archipelago. In the 15th century, large numbers of Malay Seafarers converted to Islam. You can read more from the source at Wikipedia

Southeast Asia and Australia give archaeologists some of the best evidence for ancient sea crossings, not just by Palaeolithic humans but also by Neolithic peoples and even spice traders contemporary with the Roman Empire. New discoveries, some controversial, are pushing back the dates of human colonization of this region and are expanding our knowledge of early island networks. These finds are also illuminating the first steps in some of the longest prehistoric open-sea voyages of colonization on record–from Southeast Asia to Polynesian islands such as Hawaii, Easter Island, and New Zealand, and perhaps also from Indonesia to Madagascar–during the first millennium A.D.

To understand the implications of these discoveries, one must be aware that the Indo-Malaysian Archipelago contains two very different biogeographical regions. The western islands on the Sunda Shelf–Sumatra, Java, Bali, and Borneo–were joined to each other and to the Asian mainland by landbridges during glacial periods of low sea level. Hence they supported rich Asian placental mammal faunas and were colonized by Homo erectus, perhaps as early as 1.8 million years ago. The eastern islands–Sulawesi, Lombok, Flores, Timor, the Moluccas, and the Philippines–have never been linked by landbridges to either the Sunda Shelf or Australia, or to each other. They had limited mammal faunas, chance arrivals from Asia and Australasia… (A publication of the Archaeological Institute of America)